Brian Westley read my post about an Atheist group spending all that loot to put “There Probably Isn’t A God” posters all over the U.K.  My biggest complaint was why they didn’t follow through with the statement and say that “There Isn’t A God” if they were going to spend so much money to make a statement.  Apparantly, if I did any research at all for my posts (which I don’t), then I would have taken a second to read the FAQs on the Atheist Bus website.  Here’s the response for “Why Probably” taken from their website:

“As with the famous Carlsberg ads (‘probably the best lager in the world’), ‘probably’ helps to ensure that our ads will not breach any advertising codes Committee of Advertising Practice advised the campaign that “the inclusion of the word ‘probably’ makes it less likely to cause offence, and therefore be in breach of the Advertising Code.”

Ariane Sherine has said, ‘There’s another reason I’m keen on the “probably”: it means the slogan is more accurate, as even though there’s no scientific evidence at all for God’s existence, it’s also impossible to prove that God doesn’t exist (or that anything doesn’t). As Richard Dawkins states in The God Delusion, saying “there’s no God” is taking a “faith” position. He writes: “Atheists do not have faith; and reason alone could not propel one to total conviction that anything definitely does not exist”. His choice of words in the book is “almost certainly”; but while this is closer to what most atheists believe, “probably” is shorter and catchier, which is helpful for advertising. I also think the word is more lighthearted, and somehow makes the message more positive.’”

Welp.  I asked a question, and I got a genuine answer, which was a pretty damn good one.  There aren’t many moments of humility for me on this blog, but I’m man enough to realize a good point when I see one.  I’m also man enough to flex so hard females get pregnant just looking at me.  It’s a gift.